Windows Community Toolkit — background and logo by .NET Foundation

The 7.0 update of the is finally available, including a huge number of new features (like the new , which we presented at .NET Conf), bug fixes and lots of changes and improvements also implemented thanks to the amazing support and feedbacks from the whole community. It also includes the second major public release of the Microsoft.Toolkit.HighPerformance package, with a large number of brand new APIs being included, performance improvements and .NET 5 support out of the box.

As a small recap on the HighPerformance package itself: this is a library part of the Windows Community…


C# language — background image by Procreator UX Design Studio on Unsplash

With this year’s just coming to a close, we have finally been introduced to the public release of and , which are now widely available and can be used by developers using at least Visual Studio version 16.8, that comes bundled with all the necessary components to build libraries and applications using these two new technologies.

Despite all the excitement around all of this, I have seen plenty of developers on Twitter and other channels feeling left out. The reason was they thought they could not benefit from either of these new tools on older…


C# language — background image by Sai Kiran Anagani on Unsplash

I have always been very interested in code optimizations, even when achieving the best possible execution time is not really necessary — I consider trying to improve my code and squeezing out as much performance as possible to be both fun and a useful learning exercise.

I have recently rewritten a simple method to count the number of occurrences of a given char into a string, and in doing so I also had a chance to experiment with vectorized instructions, which is something that I had always considered fascinating but that I had never taken the time to read up…


C# language — background by Fotis Fotopolous on Unsplash

I have recently been spending a lot of time working on , a .NET Standard 2.1 library written in C# 8.0 that lets you run code in parallel on the GPU through DX12 and dynamically generated HLSL compute shaders. That is a somewhat unintuitive description for a library that does something conceptually simple: it runs code in parallel in a manner similar to , but on the GPU instead of on the CPU.

The library works as follows: just like Parallel.For it takes an instance representing the code you want to run on the GPU, it then decompiles it…

Sergio Pedri

.NET and UWP dev, Win Dev MVP, .NET Foundation member, author of the Microsoft.Toolkit Mvvm, HighPerformance, Diagnostics packages. C. Eng. master’s student.

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